Ian Chappell – When is a good time to bleed a player?

This short setback for Brook did not diminish the importance of the question “When is the right time to bleed a player?”

Brook is given the chance to make his England debut as he replaces the injured Jonny Bairstow, who has been in the races lately. Plus, The Oval – with renowned real pitching – is a good place for any hitter to start a Test career. The timing was also good, as Brook is in the middle of a red ball goal streak, despite his premier runs having been compiled earlier in the season.

Did Brook, who had been on a previous tour with the England test team, wait too long?

At 23, and having shown obvious talent over the past few years, he is definitely ready to seize his chance. There is a theory that around 20 is the right age to start the testing career of a player who has obvious talent. It is generally believed that if you make a talented player wait too long, it will hurt them more by playing against less good players during that time than if they are challenged by better opponents.

When asked about Australian academy youngster Ricky Ponting, I said: “He’s an international player waiting. All I need to know is what ‘he has in his head and in his heart. In a very short time, Ponting showed that he had all the elements necessary to be a very successful hitter at the highest level.

A good coach doesn’t need all the stats and spreadsheets to determine if a player is ready for a top rating. A few minutes of watching a good drummer will tell you if he has the talent required. Then it’s up to the individual’s desire and brain power whether or not they succeed.

That’s all there is to know about Brook. There is no doubt that he has all the shots and is ready to play them. And that’s the direction the game itself is heading overall. Yet, while it is great to see batting aggression become an integral part of the test of cricket, there remains the crucial issue of choosing the right time to attack. Cricket should never become an omnipotence game; the bat in test cricket must retain some artistry.

It is generally believed that if you make a talented player wait too long, it will hurt them more by playing against less good players during that time than if they are challenged by better opponents.

That’s why you have to be careful in passing comments. For example, if fast running is a recent phenomenon, as it is often expressed, then how come Victor Trumper scored a scintillating century before lunch on rain-stricken ground in 1902? How come Don Bradman charged 309 steps on the first day at Headingley in 1930, scoring 100 or more points in each of the first two sessions?

These are just two examples. Australian cricket, for its part, has always been based on a quick score when the opportunity arises.

The thing about Brook’s delayed debut is that England got lucky. First, there was Bairstow’s unlucky injury, and it also doesn’t hurt that Brook is sorting out his nerves by attacking first.

It would have been a mistake to bleed him as England struggled abroad as a team. It’s always better if a player can make his debut in a successful team and, if possible, on his home ground.

Although Brook won’t be making his home ground debut, at Headingley he is on a renowned batting ground and – barring an accident – he will now have the luxury of multiple back-to-back tests to show off his skills.

The truth is that there is no ideal time for a cricketer to make his debut, but it is the job of the selectors to try to pick a time when success is most likely to happen. for them. There’s no doubt that Brook has been waiting a long time, but his debut is still eagerly awaited and could well prove to be a success in England.

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